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Baby squirrels are falling out of their nests in the hunt for relief in the course of the scorching heatwave

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Wildlife hospitals within the Bay Area were recently flooded with baby squirrels who plummeted out of their nests in the hunt for relief from the scorching heatwave.

A squirrel nest is built to contain heat, in order that baby squirrels are warm on chilly nights, but nests get incredibly hot when temperatures soar. 

When baby squirrels attempt to crawl away, they topple out of the nest and onto the over-heated ground. The squirrels, which often spend the primary 4 months of their lives in a nest, find yourself injuring themselves. 

‘Along with the same old injuries we see in fallen baby squirrels (broken teeth and split lips being probably the most common — baby squirrels have large heads, in order that they nearly at all times land face-first!), our medical staff needed to deal with the symptoms of hyperthermia in the infant squirrels and all of the patients we admitted that week,’ Alison Hermance, director of communications for WildCare in San Rafael, told DailyMail.com via email. 

Wildlife hospitals within the Bay Area, resembling WildCare in San Rafael (above), were recently flooded with baby squirrels who plummeted out of their nests in the hunt for relief from the scorching heatwave

When baby squirrels try to crawl away, they topple out of the nest and onto the over-heated ground. The squirrels, which usually spend the first four months of their lives in a nest, end up injuring themselves. Above: healthy and recovered baby squirrels after a week at WildCare

When baby squirrels attempt to crawl away, they topple out of the nest and onto the over-heated ground. The squirrels, which often spend the primary 4 months of their lives in a nest, find yourself injuring themselves. Above: healthy and recovered baby squirrels after per week at WildCare

A squirrel nest is built to contain heat, so that baby squirrels are warm on chilly nights, but that means nests get incredibly hot when temperatures soar. Above: a squirrel at the Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley

A squirrel nest is built to contain heat, in order that baby squirrels are warm on chilly nights, but which means nests get incredibly hot when temperatures soar. Above: a squirrel on the Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley

Volunteers and medical workers see broken teeth, split lips and hyperthermia, WildCare told DailyMail.com

Volunteers and medical staff see broken teeth, split lips and hyperthermia, WildCare told DailyMail.com

WildCare admitted 15 hyperthermic, or overheated, baby squirrels in the course of the three hottest days of the heatwave. 

Hermance explained that medical interventions include giving the injured little squirrels subcutaneous fluids, providing careful cooling, giving them oral dextrose and a hydrating electrolyte solution, in addition to treatment for shock including oxygen.

‘As with humans, our wildlife patients experiencing hyperthermia (overheating) have to be cooled down, but you’ll be able to’t cool them down too quickly otherwise you risk organ damage and death (that is another excuse we don’t desire people to attempt to cool down hot animals themselves,’ she said. 

‘It must be done with great care – seizures are an actual risk with hyperthermia, in order that’s another excuse patients should be monitored closely.’

Hermance also told DailyMail.com that when conditions are good for mating, tree squirrels in the world are known to supply a second brood in late summer or early fall. She added that they’ve seen a baby boom of sorts since late August, which she called a ‘squirrel-palooza,’ noting that the middle was already caring for 40 babies even before the heatwave hit.

The Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley was caring for over 200 tree squirrels as of Saturday and they were expecting more

 The Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley was caring for over 200 tree squirrels as of Saturday they usually were expecting more

'We had 14 squirrels come in in an hour. People were lined up outside the gate to get in when we opened,' Laura Hawkins, executive director of the Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley, told CBS News. 'It's a tidal wave, yeah'

‘We had 14 squirrels are available in an hour. People were lined up outside the gate to get in once we opened,’ Laura Hawkins, executive director of the Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley, told CBS News. ‘It is a tidal wave, yeah’

'Some of them are really docile,' Andy Young, a volunteer at the center, said. 'Like you wouldn't think that, but some of them will just lay there and happily get fed when they are younger'

‘A few of them are really docile,’ Andy Young, a volunteer at the middle, said. ‘Like you would not think that, but a few of them will just lay there and happily get fed once they are younger’

All the center's volunteers had to pull shifts to do hand feedings (above) for the distressed squirrels four times a day

All the middle’s volunteers had to drag shifts to do hand feedings (above) for the distressed squirrels 4 times a day

The Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley was caring for over 200 tree squirrels as of Saturday they usually were expecting more. Out of that group, most were blanketed in small cages and just a few dozen were being cared for at volunteers’ homes.  

‘We had 14 squirrels are available in an hour. People were lined up outside the gate to get in once we opened,’ Laura Hawkins, executive director of the Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley, told CBS News. ‘It is a tidal wave, yeah.’

All the middle’s volunteers had to drag shifts to do hand feedings for the distressed squirrels 4 times a day.

‘A few of them are really docile,’ Andy Young, a volunteer at the middle, said. ‘Like you would not think that, but a few of them will just lay there and happily get fed once they are younger.’

Staffers told the news outlet that when the squirrels are released, they need to easily find a way to revert to living within the wild.

Buffy Martin Tarbox of the Peninsula Humane Society, which was treating 101 squirrels, told The Mercury News: ‘They’re literally jumping from their nests to flee the warmth. The young animals ‘don’t have the climbing skills to get back up.’

Adult squirrels within the Bay Area have been seen splooting – flattening themselves on the bottom as strategy to reduce body heat. Mammals can in fact sweat as a way of cooling off. 

Adult squirrels in the Bay Area have been seen splooting - flattening themselves on the ground as way to reduce body heat. Mammals can of course sweat as a way of cooling off

Adult squirrels within the Bay Area have been seen splooting – flattening themselves on the bottom as strategy to reduce body heat. Mammals can in fact sweat as a way of cooling off

Buffy Martin Tarbox of the Peninsula Humane Society, which was treating 101 squirrels, told The Mercury News: 'They’re literally jumping from their nests to escape the heat. The young animals 'don’t have the climbing skills to get back up'

Buffy Martin Tarbox of the Peninsula Humane Society, which was treating 101 squirrels, told The Mercury News: ‘They’re literally jumping from their nests to flee the warmth. The young animals ‘don’t have the climbing skills to get back up’

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