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Early revenge porn site fell when expert found evidence of pedophilia and suicide on the platform

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A cybersecurity expert featured in a Netflix documentary that exposes the trouble to bring down the primary revenge porn website says he was instrumental in securing its downfall after he discovered what he believes is evidence of pedophilia and suicide.

Netflix’s The Most Hated Man chronicles the fight to bring down IsAnyoneUp.com and its founder Hunter Moore. The positioning allowed people to post nude photos of anyone and link them to their social media accounts. Often, the images were hacked or posted by bitter exes, earning the nefarious site its status because the world’s first home for revenge porn.

The three-part documentary focuses on Charlotte Laws whose daughter Kayla’s nude pictures appeared on the positioning.

But cybersecurity expert James McGibney, who also appears within the show, said it was his work behind the scenes that really brought the revenge porn site to an end.

McGibney, a former Marine who was in command of cybersecurity for 128 US embassies while within the armed forces, said he used his knowledge of computer systems to find out that a lot of the pictures on IsAnyoneUp were of underage girls – and claims that a question on the positioning for the word ‘suicide’ revealed some victims had taken their very own lives.

Within the documentary, McGibney claimed he approached Moore with the knowledge of the underage girls in a bid to persuade the king of revenge porn to sell him the IsAnyoneUp domain. 

The cybersecurity expert told DailyMail.com that he also told Moore that it might only be a matter of time before the world finds out concerning the women who committed suicide. 

Shortly after this conversation allegedly took place, Moore sold the IsAnyoneUp domain for ‘lower than $12,000,’ McGibney told Dailymail.com. 

James McGibney (pictured) told DailyMail.com how he helped take down Hunter Moore’s site, IsAnyoneUp, in 2012. McGibney is a cybersecurity expert and former Marine 

Moore eventually went to jail in 2015, but it surely was not for the revenge porn site – he was found guilty of aggravated identity theft and aiding and abetting unauthorized access of a pc. And he spent 30 months in a federal lockup.

IsAnyoneUp, which launched in 2010, allowed users to anonymously post sexually explicit images of individuals without their consent at a time when there was no laws regarding revenge porn.

Moore was also protected by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, a law that claims web sites can’t be held answerable for the content users post on their platforms. 

On IsAnyoneUp, not only were people allowed to share explicit pictures without consent, but the web site encouraged users to go away harmful and aggressive comments. A few of those comments encouraged women to commit suicide or gave users information needed to stalk them in the true world, in keeping with the Netflix documentary.

Hunter Moore (pictured) started IsAnyoneUp in 2010, but he quickly turned it into a revenge porn site that encouraged users to anonymously post sexually explicit images of people without consent, according to the Netflix documentary

Hunter Moore (pictured) began IsAnyoneUp in 2010, but he quickly turned it right into a revenge porn site that encouraged users to anonymously post sexually explicit images of individuals without consent, in keeping with the Netflix documentary 

‘The Most Hated Man on the Web’ claims that profiles were created with each image and on many occasions included the person’s Facebook page, address, and phone number.

At its peak, IsAnyoneUp had greater than 350,000 subscribers and 30 million page views. 

McGibney believes Moore ‘got caught up in a site that was getting larger,’ he said, suggesting because of this the self-proclaimed king of revenge porn turned to hacker Charlie Evans for help.

Evans infiltrated emails to steal naked photos of girls who sent them to their very own inboxes, which was the case for Kayla Laws.

Her images appeared on IsAnyoneUp, which first launched in 2010, and her mother, Charlotte, went to battle with Moore to get them removed. 

The images were displayed as profiles, which sometimes showed the victim's Facebook page, address and phone number

The photographs were displayed as profiles, which sometimes showed the victim’s Facebook page, address and phone number

McGibney claims he was able to extract data from images that showed some of the women were actually underage girls and he found evidence that suggested some killed themselves because their pictures were online

McGibney claims he was capable of extract data from images that showed a few of the women were actually underage girls and he found evidence that suggested some killed themselves because their pictures were online

McGibney said he was originally approached by Moore, who offered him a possibility to advertise on IsAnyoneUp in 2012 because, although he was living the highlife, the self-described king of revenge porn was going broke.

‘He was really desperate. He was running out of cash and that’s how I had him,’ McGibney told DailyMail.com, while also saying Moore mistakenly let a wolf into his hen house.

When McGibney first saw the content on IsAnyoneUp, he was reminded of the horrors he endured as a toddler within the Latest York City foster care system some 40 years ago.

‘I had a wierd flashback after I saw that site the very first time,’ McGibney told DailyMail.com.

‘It was one among my foster families who forced me and my foster sister to face naked within the front room for hours.

‘I saw the positioning and the way he [the foster father] would take her and rape her. I had suppressed that memory, but IsAnyoneUp made me consider her and I went ballistic.’ 

This lit a fireplace under McGibney that he claims led him to uncover images on the positioning featuring underage girls.

Moore has publicly said he had ‘five kids’ in his kitchen taking a look at submitted photos all day to confirm ages. But from the attitude of a cybersecurity expert, it was nearly not possible to maintain up when there are a whole bunch of photos being uploaded per day.

‘There’s so much to it. I needed to grab a photograph and pull EXIF [Exchangeable Image File Formatdata] of the latitude and longitude of where it was taken,’ McGibney said, explaining EXIF data shows information like when and where the image was taken, and what camera was used.

IsAnyoneUp now redirects users to McGibney's anti-bullying site Bullyville

IsAnyoneUp now redirects users to McGibney’s anti-bullying site Bullyville

‘This [for example] told me a woman lives together with her parents and it shows me her Facebook page that claims she is definitely 15 years old and never 19 as shown on the web site. I did this on just a few occasions,’ he continued. This instance can be explained within the Netflix documentary.

‘It [pictures of underage girls] wasn’t rampant, but I discovered some. After I saw that, I knew I had Moore cornered.’

There was chatter on the dark web that McGibney had access to IsAnyoneUp’s content management system (CMS), but when DailyMail.com asked him if he did, McGibney wouldn’t comment. 

If McGibney, or anyone for that matter, were to access IsAnyOneUp’s CMS, they’d first need to verify the targeted website after which discover the IP address.

Then the person scans for open ports that provide opportunities to ‘listen’ for traffic on it and spot if there are any vulnerabilities within the ports.

And if one is discovered, the hacker can use it to realize access to the system after which simply brute-force the username and password of the web site’s backend.

Brute force hacking normally involves automation, or manual motion, of guessing every possible combination of characters that might be combined to unlock an account. 

Within the event people use something like EXIF data to find out traits or details about their victim, they will use manual brute force – guessing their password through the use of common things like birthdays or an individual’s dog’s name. 

IsAnyoneUp now redirects users to McGibney’s anti-bullying site Bullyville. Nevertheless, Moore selling McGibney the domain was not the one a part of the deal. 

Moore also had to jot down an apology letter that was posted to the web site.

there was another stipulation of the deal: Moore had to write an apology letter that would be posted on McGibney's site.

there was one other stipulation of the deal: Moore had to jot down an apology letter that will be posted on McGibney’s site.

It wasn't too long before Moore changed his tune and went after McGibney on Twitter, calling the former marine a 'pedophile.' This caught the attention of the group Anonymous who went after Moore by declaring him dead in California for two months

It wasn’t too long before Moore modified his tune and went after McGibney on Twitter, calling the previous marine a ‘pedophile.’ This caught the eye of the group Anonymous who went after Moore by declaring him dead in California for 2 months

Within the letter, which was published to Bullyville in 2012, Moore wrote concerning the good times he had while at the highest of his game, specifically the women getting ‘naked of all sizes on the IAU [IsAnyoneUp] parties; we did it from Canada to Vegas,’ he wrote.

Moore also states he ‘might do some writing on bullyville.com to assist individuals who have been bullied; I have been on each side of the fence. I’m putting this message up on Bullyville.com to arise for underage bullying’ – this has yet to be seen.

It wasn’t too long before Moore modified his tune and went after McGibney on Twitter, calling the previous marine a ‘pedophile.’

The overwhelming memories of his abusive childhood got here rushing back again when McGibney saw the tweet, which reads: ‘how are you going to assist stop bullying if you’re a pedophile and go to china to rent children from families with no money.’

Shortly after the tweet surfaced, the group Anonymous entered the sport. Anonymous, often called ‘hactivists,’ are known for unleashing coordinated cyberattacks against various world governments, corporations and other groups. This time they used their abilities to take down probably the most hated man on the web and, as described within the documentary, the group hacked Moore’s checking account, amongst other things.

‘Hunter denies he was hacked, he also said dildos weren’t sent to his house, but they were in a bag with a note that read, ‘Eat a bag of d*cks’,’ McGibney said, while noting it was the group Anonymous that sent them.

McGibney (pictured) said he believes the public would forgive Moore if he just apologizes, but Moore recently said he wishes he went harder with IsAnyoneUp

McGibney (pictured) said he believes the general public would forgive Moore if he just apologizes, but Moore recently said he wishes he went harder with IsAnyoneUp

‘His checking account was also hacked [by Anonymous] and the irony is the quantity missing was the identical amount I had paid for the positioning and it was donated to battered women across the nation.

‘He was also declared dead within the state of California for 2 months. His death certificate was filed.’

Moore, nevertheless, didn’t seem bothered by the malicious acts and announced he was moving forward with IsAnyoneUp2 but his plans were stifled when the web trove of explicit photos mysteriously vanished, in keeping with the Netflix documentary. And IsAnyoneUp2 also redirects traffic to Bullyville.

When asked if he wiped the servers of IsAnyoneUp2, McGibney responded ‘prove it.’

DailyMail.com has contacted Moore for comment.

McGibney remains to be in a battle with Moore, primarily over greater than $345,000 he says is owed to him from a 2013 defamation lawsuit against the ‘king of revenge porn’ for the damning tweets. Moore was ordered to pay $250,000 but has not yet fulfilled the penalty, and it has since been increased with interest.

‘Some people said I overreacted, but I do not give a sh*t,’ McGibney said

‘If Hunter got here out and said ‘I’m sorry, I’m a modified man and I’m sorry to the victims,’ we’re in a forgiving society and [we might be able to move past it].

‘But he got here out [two weeks ago] saying he wishes he had gone harder.’

Speaking with RDAP DAN, a YouTuber, Moore said: ”I had an awesome time, I don’t have any regrets, I wish I had gone 10 times harder since the result would have been the identical.’ 

The person who took down probably the most hated man on the web: James McGibney shares how he went from an abused boy in foster care to a decorated Marine, cybersecurity expert and family man 

James McGibney has was an online sensation following the discharge of ‘Most Hated Man on the Web.’ But long before people were calling him ‘the GOAT’ on Twitter for taking down Moore, McGibney was fighting one other battle in his childhood home.

Born in Latest York City, McGibney was living within the south Bronx with a father who continually beat him, his brother, and his mother.

McGibney said  the moment he saw the naked women, and some men, on the website he had a strange flashback to one of the many horrific experiences he had while in the New York City foster care system from the age of eight to 11. Here, he is pictured while in foster care

McGibney said  the moment he saw the naked women, and a few men, on the web site he had a wierd flashback to one among the various horrific experiences he had while within the Latest York City foster care system from the age of eight to 11. Here, he’s pictured while in foster care

Child services stepped in when McGibney was eight years old, but what was considered an escape from his dangerous father was a world of torture, humiliation, and evil. It was not until Patrick and Mary McGibney adopted him on October 17, 1984, did the nightmare finally end. 

McGibney has since moved on from the horrors he endured but has never lost hope of finding his brother Stephen, who he last saw about 41 years ago.

‘I used to be put in a foster care system at age eight and my brother was 4 or five,’ he said, while noting each foster family was worse than the one before.

McGibney joined the Marines in 1992 as a clerk, but then found a passion for cybersecurity. This led him to controlling the cybersecurity for 128 US embassies worldwide

McGibney joined the Marines in 1992 as a clerk, but then found a passion for cybersecurity. This led him to controlling the cybersecurity for 128 US embassies worldwide

‘He’s special needs, severely autistic, and went to a unique family.

McGibney is currently looking for his brother. 

McGibney joined the Marines in 1992 as a clerk, but then found a passion for cybersecurity. He worked his way up through the ranks and located himself overseeing cybersecurity for 128 US embassies around the globe. 

While within the Marines, he also worked with the Third Surveillance Reconnaissance Intelligence Group and Marine Security Guard Battalion.

And he received the Navy Achievement Medal for his service, which recognizes service members who display acts of heroism.

After concluding his military profession in 2000, McGibney went on to get his Master’s Degree in Criminal Justice from Boston University, earned his cybersecurity certification from Harvard University, attended Harvard Business School for his Executive Education and is now working on a Doctorate in Technology at Pepperdine University.

He now lives in Austin, Texas along with his wife Christina and his three sons. 

When McGibney isn't taking down revenge porn sites, he spends time with his wife Christina and three boys in Texas

When McGibney is not taking down revenge porn sites, he spends time along with his wife Christina and three boys in Texas

‘In the long run, when it’s all said and done, I need my horrific childhood to be regarded as a positive message of hope,’ McGibney told DailyMail.com.

‘I used to be living on the streets within the South Bronx after I was eight. One foster mom left me at a mall, and I never saw her again. One foster dad pissed on me (after he punched me so hard he knocked me out) right after he raped my 7-year-old stepsister. I won’t ever forgive, nor will I ever forget. 

‘But all that torture and torment was a stepping stone. Just stay the course and be your individual best friend. Most significantly, don’t give a sh*t what people say about you, that is your life, not theirs.’

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