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Hiker captures mesmerising footage of a rare ‘ice pancake’ within the Scottish Highlands 

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Discuss an ice view! Hiker captures mesmerising footage of a rare frozen ‘pancake’ within the Scottish Highlands

A hiker captured the incredibly rare phenomenon of an ‘ice pancake’ on a mountain walk within the Scottish Highlands.

The circular sheet of ice is seen in a glen on the mountain of Beinn Bhuidhe, which is south of Lochan Shira, and north of Achadunan.

Dan Brown, 32, from Dunoon was mountain climbing up the Munro when he got here across the rare sight together with his father.

He said: ‘I used to be mountain climbing Beinn Bhuidhe, a Munro at the top of Loch Fyne, with my father.

The circular sheet of ice is seen in a glen on the mountain of Beinn Bhuidhe, which is south of Lochan Shira, and north of Achadunan

A hiker captured the incredibly rare phenomenon of an ‘ice pancake’ on a mountain walk within the Scottish Highlands

How do ice pancakes form? 

Ice pancakes can form in considered one of two distinct ways, each of which require very specific conditions. 

In oceans, seas and lakes, ice pancakes form when waves cause forming pieces of ice to knock against one another, rounding their edges as they freeze and grow. 

‘Small rims are created on the sides because the knocking causes splashing water to freeze and join the rim,’ the Met Office explained. 

Alternatively, ice pancakes can form when foam on a river begins to freeze. 

The froth joins together, and because it is sucked into an eddy, a circular shape begins to form. 

‘As other bits of frozen foam and ice hit the forming disc they freeze to it and increase its size,’ the Met Office added. 

While ice pancakes often appear to be solid discs, they are often quite slushy and simply break apart when lifted up. 

‘Nonetheless, when given the conditions to consolidate, ice pancakes can find yourself binding with one another to form sheet ice and in rougher conditions waves can move these sheets of ice causing them to bend and crack to create ice ridges,’ the Met Office concluded. 

‘We might taken mountain bikes with us and, for the perfect part, had been carrying them up a hydro track.

‘Visibility wasn’t great, but after about an hour-and-a-half the snow stopped and cloud cover began to clear.

‘We took a break to fill our water bottles from the burn by the track – that is after we noticed the ice disk slowly spinning on the foot of a small waterfall.’

Each Dan and his father had never seen or experienced an ice disk within the flesh and were bowled over.

He added: ‘Neither of us had ever seen anything prefer it, an ideal circle of ice slowly rotating within the water, so we thought it have to be a rare occurrence and took some photographs and videos.

‘We assumed on the time that it was attributable to the flow of the waterfall meeting the present of the burn, it wasn’t until afterwards I examine ice disks and realised this was what we might witnessed.

‘We hadn’t encountered anyone else on the hike, it felt like we were the one people for miles around.

‘So then to occur across something so serene and perfectly formed, it felt surreal.’

Ice pancakes can range in size from 7.8 inches (20cm) to 78 inches (200cm) wide, and are ‘relatively rare’, based on the Met Office

‘They’re most steadily seen within the Baltic Sea and around Antarctica but additionally form relatively steadily on the Great Lakes of the USA and Canada,’ it explained.

Ice pancakes can form in considered one of two distinct ways, each of which require very specific conditions. 

In oceans, seas and lakes, ice pancakes form when waves cause forming pieces of ice to knock against one another, rounding their edges as they freeze and grow. 

Ice pancakes can range in size from 7.8 inches (20cm) to 78 inches (200cm) wide, and are 'relatively rare', according to the Met Office

Ice pancakes can range in size from 7.8 inches (20cm) to 78 inches (200cm) wide, and are ‘relatively rare’, based on the Met Office

‘Small rims are created on the sides because the knocking causes splashing water to freeze and join the rim,’ the Met Office explained. 

Alternatively, ice pancakes can form when foam on a river begins to freeze. 

The froth joins together, and because it is sucked into an eddy (a swirling current of water), a circular shape begins to form. 

‘As other bits of frozen foam and ice hit the forming disc they freeze to it and increase its size,’ the Met Office added. 

While ice pancakes often appear to be solid discs, they are often quite slushy and simply break apart when lifted up. 

‘Nonetheless, when given the conditions to consolidate, ice pancakes can find yourself binding with one another to form sheet ice and in rougher conditions waves can move these sheets of ice causing them to bend and crack to create ice ridges,’ the Met Office concluded. 

Why IS the British weather so changeable? UK is ‘unique’ because FIVE air masses battle for supremacy above it

Warm and sunny one minute, rain the subsequent, sometimes the British weather may be so wildly changeable it’s difficult to maintain up. 

MailOnline spoke to several meteorologists about what makes the UK’s weather so ‘unique’, as one put it, and whether some other country on the planet compares.

At the guts of it are five most important air masses that every have similar temperature and moisture properties. They battle for supremacy above Britain and may spark a unprecedented mixture of atmospheric conditions after they clash. 

Which weather will we get? There are five main air masses that battle it out above Britain. They include the Polar Maritime, Arctic Maritime, Polar Continental, Tropical Continental and Tropical Maritime. A sixth air mass, known as the returning Polar Maritime, also affects the UK

Which weather will we get? There are five most important air masses that battle it out above Britain. They include the Polar Maritime, Arctic Maritime, Polar Continental, Tropical Continental and Tropical Maritime. A sixth air mass, often known as the returning Polar Maritime, also affects the UK

‘The UK doesn’t have its own weather,’ said Met Office forecaster Aidan McGivern, ‘it borrows it from elsewhere.’

‘That’s what the air masses are — large bodies of air that come from other places.’ 

Professor Liz Bentley, CEO of the Royal Meteorological Society, said: ‘When two air masses are next to one another that’s after we get dramatic weather conditions.

‘Air masses are depending on wind direction; if coming from the continent they’re continental, from the north they’re polar, from the ocean it’s maritime and from the south they’re tropical.’  

They include the Polar Maritime, Arctic Maritime, Polar Continental, Tropical Continental and Tropical Maritime. A sixth air mass, often known as the returning Polar Maritime, can also be seen above Britain and is a variation of the Polar Maritime.

Each air mass brings a unique form of weather, but as they meet and battle it out, it is the one which wins which dictates if we get warm sunshine, freezing rain or a spectacular thunderstorm.

Professor Bentley added: ‘Although all of the air masses have a task to play, the prevailing wind direction for us is westerly so we are likely to see more coming from the Atlantic.

‘Within the winter, air from the continent could be very cold. That is why we had the Beast from the East in 2018 — because freezing air was coming from Siberia.

‘Nonetheless, in the summertime, when the Tropical Continental air mass is more common, the air is warm since it’s coming from a very popular continent, so that you’re prone to get heatwaves.’ 

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