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Scheduling of major sporting events is SEXIST, study claims 

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From England’s win on the Women’s Euros to the primary ever female offshoot of the Tour de France, 2022 has definitely been a monumental 12 months for girls’s sport.

But a recent study claims that the scheduling of a lot of these events is sexist.

Researchers from the University of Technology, Sydney, say that ladies’s finals are treated like ‘warm-up events’ to the boys’s.

This, they claim, sends the message that ladies are second-class athletes.

‘It’s time to challenge the gender hierarchy in sport, and to explicitly and proudly show that the achievements of female athletes are as valued as those of male athletes,’ the team said.

Researchers from the University of Technology, Sydney, say that ladies’s finals are treated like ‘warm-up events’ to the boys’s. Pictured: Elena Rybakina celebrates her win at Wimbledon

Masculine titles are SEXIST and undermine women’s roles as leaders at work, study claims 

From chairman to salesman, many job titles typically feature the word ‘man.’

Now, a study claims that these typically masculine titles are sexist and undermine women’s roles as leaders at work.

Researchers from the University of Houston found that the title of Chairman increases assumptions that a frontrunner is a person, greater than the title of Chair.

Allison M.N. Archer, who led the study, said: ‘While some dismiss gender-neutral titles as “political correctness”, this research suggests that implicitly sexist language in masculine titles reinforces stereotypes that tie masculinity to leadership and consequently, weaken the connection between women and leadership.’

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Substantial progress has been made in many ladies’s sports in recent times, in keeping with the researchers.

For instance, sports that were traditionally considered ‘men only’, resembling football and pole vault, now have women participating, while all 4 tennis Grand Slam tournaments now offer the identical prize money to female and male players.

Nevertheless, female athletes are still fighting for equality in other points of sports, they are saying.

‘Structural barriers are ubiquitous, resembling sexist uniform mandates, rules that force women to choose from breast feeding and competing, sexual harassment and impropriety against female athletes, and lower representation of ladies in sports governance, coaching, and journalism,’ they wrote of their study, published within the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

One other key obstacle facing many female athletes is the scheduling of their events, in keeping with the team.

They cite the Olympic Games before Tokyo 2020, where the ladies’s finals were at all times held before the boys’s.

‘Prior to Tokyo 2020, this scheduling bias was substantial on the Olympic Games,’ they wrote.

‘For instance, within the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, 25 hours of competition were scheduled for men’s events on the last Sunday (prime broadcasting time), but only 2 hours for girls’s events.

‘In most previous Olympic Games, and nearly all other sporting events where men and girls compete together, resembling tennis, table tennis and beach volleyball, the last two events are the ladies’s and the boys’s final – in that order.

In the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, 25 hours of competition were scheduled for men's events on the last Sunday (prime broadcasting time), but only 2 hours for women's events. Team GB runner Mo Farah pictured after completing the 'double double' at Rio 2016

Within the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, 25 hours of competition were scheduled for men’s events on the last Sunday (prime broadcasting time), but only 2 hours for girls’s events. Team GB runner Mo Farah pictured after completing the ‘double double’ at Rio 2016

Women are only as competitive as men, study finds 

Women are only as competitive as men, in keeping with a study that found they enter competitions at the identical rate as men, but usually tend to share their winnings.

Putting volunteers in groups and asking them to finish a series of maths problems in return for a reward helped researchers from the University of Arizona in Tucson to check gender differences in relation to competition.

The 238 participants were evenly split between men and girls, and had the choice of selecting a guaranteed prize for an accurate result, a bigger prize in the event that they were a top performer, or a bigger prize with the choice to share the winnings with the losers.

If given the possibility to share their winnings, 60 per cent of ladies opted for competition, whereas only 35 per cent decided to compete in the event that they won the lot. 

In contrast, 51 per cent of men opted for the winner-take-all option, in comparison with 52.5 per cent of men going for gold in the event that they got to share their reward with the losers.

Researchers say that female participants could also be more involved in controlling the way in which the winnings are dived up among the many other participants than the boys.

‘This perpetuates a gender hierarchy through which the ladies’s final is taken into account the ‘warm-up’ towards the supposed climax of the competition, the boys’s final.’

The researchers imagine that this scheduling bias can have a domino effect for women and girls all over the world.

‘These obstacles not only hold female athletes back from achieving their full potential and being celebrated as the top of their sports, but they may additionally hold back women and girls all over the world from embracing sport and reaping the total advantages of an lively lifestyle,’ they added.

Women are less physically lively than men globally, with surveys showing that within the UK, only 12 per cent of women aged 14 meet the official guidelines for physical activity.

Based on the findings, the researchers are calling for ‘one small, yet potentially impactful change.’

‘We call on the International Olympic Committee and all major sports federations all over the world who run events through which each men and girls compete, resembling tennis, to alternate the order of the boys’s and girls’s finals between tournaments,’ they suggest.

‘Broadcasting rights are a predominant source of income of major sports events and, as previously mentioned, women’s sports often receive far less media coverage than men’s sports.

‘We contend that our proposed change is unlikely to affect total viewership.

‘Taking Grand Slam tennis tournaments for example, broadcasters often show each the ladies’s and the boys’s final live at the identical time of day on consecutive days (often each weekend days).

‘Our proposal doesn’t involve adding, dropping or replacing coverage, but only to alternate the order of those finals between tournaments which can have minimal impact on viewers.’

While it stays unclear whether these changes can be considered, the researchers say that ‘any progress’ is important.

‘Any progress is important if it results in more women and girls all over the world engaging in physical activity and sport to cultivate their full potential on and off the sports field,’ they concluded.

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