15.1 C
New York

Skies the world over are lit up by stunning Sturgeon supermoon on its final appearance of the 12 months

Published:

Skies the world over have been lit up by the ultimate ‘supermoon’ of the 12 months tonight – with keen astronomers having the prospect to see shooting stars from the Perseids Meteor Shower too.

Tonight’s moon, which is referred to as the Sturgeon supermoon, is about to succeed in full brightness at 2.36am because it illuminates large parts of the UK.

Apart from a number of unlucky parts of northern Scotland where there was cloud cover, many of the UK has been treated to a much greater and brighter moon than normal overnight. 

It’s because the complete moon – when your complete face is lit up – is happening when it’s at its closest point to the Earth in its orbit.

Photographers and people looking up on the sky have been treated to excellent views, and may enjoy it while it lasts, as there just isn’t set to be one other supermoon until next 12 months. 

Some have taken the chance, with stunning images of the rising moon taken in London, and on the south coast, while photographers in other countries have also captured dramatic images. 

The orange Sturgeon supermoon rises over London earlier this evening. Here it’s pictured behind The Shard, putting on a stunning display  

Pictured: The full Sturgeon supermoon rises up behind the Needles lighthouse in Dorset earlier this evening, after a scorching day on the south coast

Pictured: The total Sturgeon supermoon rises up behind the Needles lighthouse in Dorset earlier this evening, after a scorching day on the south coast

Pictured: The Sturgeon supermoon rises behind Stonehenge in Wiltshire this evening. The moon appeared on the horizon in an orange colour after the sun set

Pictured: The Sturgeon supermoon rises behind Stonehenge in Wiltshire this evening. The moon appeared on the horizon in an orange color after the sun set

The Sturgeon supermoon is seen bright in the sky as it rises behind buildings in the banking district of Frankfurt, in Germany

The Sturgeon supermoon is seen brilliant within the sky because it rises behind buildings within the banking district of Frankfurt, in Germany

Pictured: The Sturgeon supermoon rises behind buildings in Amman, which is the capital of Jordan in the Middle East, earlier today

Pictured: The Sturgeon supermoon rises behind buildings in Amman, which is the capital of Jordan within the Middle East, earlier today

The bright moon illuminates the waters off the English coast tonight. Pictured in the foreground is Dovercourt Lower Lighthouse in Essex

The brilliant moon illuminates the waters off the English coast tonight. Pictured within the foreground is Dovercourt Lower Lighthouse in Essex

Pictured: The Sturgeon supermoon rises behind the iconic Camlica Mosque in the Turkish city of Istanbul earlier today

Pictured: The Sturgeon supermoon rises behind the long-lasting Camlica Mosque within the Turkish city of Istanbul earlier today

The Royal Liver Building in Liverpool is lit up by the Sturgeon supermoon this evening, in what will be the last supermoon of the year

The Royal Liver Constructing in Liverpool is lit up by the Sturgeon supermoon this evening, in what will likely be the last supermoon of the 12 months

Pictured: The Sturgeon supermoon rises behind Dunstanburgh Castle in Northumberland this evening, illuminating the landscape and the water

Pictured: The Sturgeon supermoon rises behind Dunstanburgh Castle in Northumberland this evening, illuminating the landscape and the water

In a lucky coincidence, this weekend also marks the height of the Perseids Meteor Shower, when 150 shooting stars an hour could possibly be seen within the night sky.

The meteor shower, which is commonly dubbed one of the best of 12 months due to how brilliant and energetic it’s, may additionally be visible overnight.

Although the probabilities of seeing them clearly is likely to be impacted by the supermoon, which can appear as much as 14 per cent larger and 30 per cent brighter than a standard full moon, depending on the time of 12 months. 

Nicknames which might be used to explain the supermoons were traditionally used to trace the seasons and due to this fact are closely related to nature. 

‘Sturgeon Moon’ is the common name for August’s full moon because historically the big fish was easily caught right now of 12 months. 

A supermoon occurs when a full moon nearly coincides with perigee – the point in the orbit of the moon at which it is nearest to the Earth. Pictured is last month's supermoon, on July 13

A supermoon occurs when a full moon nearly coincides with perigee – the purpose within the orbit of the moon at which it’s nearest to the Earth. Pictured is last month’s supermoon, on July 13

At the point in the Moon's orbit when it's closest to the Earth, it appears 14 per cent bigger than a micromoon, and vice versa

At the purpose within the Moon’s orbit when it’s closest to the Earth, it appears 14 per cent greater than a micromoon, and vice versa

July's super moon is seen as a deer grazes outside the village of Taarbaek, some 15 km north of Copenhagen, on July 14, 2022

July’s super moon is seen as a deer grazes outside the village of Taarbaek, some 15 km north of Copenhagen, on July 14, 2022

Pictured is the moon rising behind Glastonbury Tor in Somerset on Wednesday evening (August 10). The moon was at 96 per cent illumination on Wednesday night. When it reaches 100 per cent illumination on Thursday night it will be a full moon. The moon will also be a supermoon tonight, because it marks the point in the orbit of the moon at which it is nearest to the Earth

Pictured is the moon rising behind Glastonbury Tor in Somerset on Wednesday evening (August 10). The moon was at 96 per cent illumination on Wednesday night. When it reaches 100 per cent illumination on Thursday night it’ll be a full moon. The moon will even be a supermoon tonight, since it marks the purpose within the orbit of the moon at which it’s nearest to the Earth

WHAT IS A SUPERMOON? 

A ‘supermoon’ appears to us as a larger-than-usual Moon in our night sky. 

A supermoon takes place when the moon is full and its orbit at its perigee point is closest to Earth.

Because the moon orbits in an ellipse its closest point – the perigee – will come very near earth. The farthest point of the ellipse is known as the apogee. 

When a full moon appears at perigee, the moon looks brighter and bigger than an everyday moon, hence the nickname supermoon.  

It’s well-known that a full moon occurs roughly every 29.5 days, but a supermoon is a much rarer event. 

In 2022, there have been three supermoons to date in accordance with the Old Farmer’s Almanac, on May 16, June 14 and July 13, and the fourth and final supermoon is due tonight, August 11. 

Although a supermoon is a full moon, it appears greater and brighter within the sky than a standard full moon. 

Supermoons occur since the moon orbits the Earth on an elliptical path, quite than a circular one.

This implies there’s a degree in its 29.5-day orbit where it’s closest to the Earth and, at certain times of the 12 months, it passes this point during a full moon.

A supermoon occurs when the complete moon nearly coincides with perigee – the purpose within the orbit of the moon at which it’s nearest to the Earth. 

This implies it appears as much as 14 per cent larger and 30 per cent brighter than normal, when viewed from Earth. 

Dr Daniel Brown, an astronomy expert at Nottingham Trent University, told MailOnline: ‘A supermoon will likely be defined as the most important full moon possible.

‘This full moon is going on when the moon is that little bit closer to Earth than it’s during other full moons. 

‘It is a time that many turn out to be excited and need to look at the moon themselves, particularly because the moon rise and set offers stunning photographic opportunities.’ 

Pictured is the moon rising behind Stonehenge in Wiltshire on Wednesday evening (August 10) It will appear even bigger and brighter Thursday night

Pictured is the moon rising behind Stonehenge in Wiltshire on Wednesday evening (August 10) It’s going to appear even greater and brighter Thursday night 

People watch last month's supermoon from the observation tower in Syke, Germany, July 13, 2022

People watch last month’s supermoon from the statement tower in Syke, Germany, July 13, 2022

July's supermoon rises behind the antenna on top of One World Trade Center in New York City on July 13, 2022

July’s supermoon rises behind the antenna on top of One World Trade Center in Recent York City on July 13, 2022

In 2022, there have been three supermoons so far according to the Old Farmer's Almanac, on May 16, June 14 and July 13, and the fourth and final supermoon is due on August 11. Pictured is July's supermoon from Sydney

In 2022, there have been three supermoons to date in accordance with the Old Farmer’s Almanac, on May 16, June 14 and July 13, and the fourth and final supermoon is due on August 11. Pictured is July’s supermoon from Sydney

TIPS FOR VIEWING A SUPERMOON 

Rise up high! The further up you might be, the higher your likelihood of a transparent sky to see the celebs, plus you will give you the option to see low right down to the horizon to observe the moon rise!  

Turn off the lights For those stargazing from the comfort of their homes, turning off the lights indoors can improve the visibility of the night sky. 

Select an evening with clear skies suggests selecting an evening when clear skies are expected for one of the best probabilities of seeing the celebs.  

Research what you are looking at Enhance the stargazing experience and download Star Chart free on AR enabled Apple or Android devices.

SOURCE: Parkdean Resorts 

While the closest point within the moon’s orbit is known as perigee – which creates an unusually large supermoon – its farthest point is known as apogee, making a ‘micromoon’. 

Because a micromoon is further away, it looks around 14 per cent smaller than a supermoon, and as its illuminated area also appears 30 per cent smaller, so it tends to look less brilliant. 

Micromoons are about 7 per cent smaller than a mean moon size, while supermoons are about 7 per cent larger. 

Also this weekend, stargazers will give you the option to enjoy a stunning meteor shower called the Perseids without the necessity for a telescope. 

Referred to as the ‘fiery tears of Saint Lawrence’, the celestial event takes place when the Earth ploughs through galactic debris left by the passing of the Swift-Tuttle Comet.

Royal Observatory Greenwich calls it ‘one of the crucial dramatic things to see within the night sky between July and August’.

This 12 months, the height of the Perseids falls on the night of August 12 (Friday) and before dawn on August 13 (Saturday). 

During this era, there could possibly be as much as 150 shooting stars per hour this 12 months, in accordance with Royal Observatory Greenwich. 

The Met Office told MailOnline that skies are expected to be completely clear for much of the UK, with excellent viewing conditions for the supermoon on Thursday night.

The full moon, otherwise known as a supermoon, is seen over the skyline of the CBD in Sydney, Australia June 15, 2022

The total moon, otherwise referred to as a supermoon, is seen over the skyline of the CBD in Sydney, Australia June 15, 2022

The moon rises above the landscape in Wimbledon south west London at sunset on August 10

The moon rises above the landscape in Wimbledon south west London at sunset on August 10

Also this weekend, stargazers will be able to enjoy a stunning meteor shower called the Perseids without the need for a telescope

Also this weekend, stargazers will give you the option to enjoy a shocking meteor shower called the Perseids without the necessity for a telescope

The meteors are called Perseids because they seem to dart out of Perseus, a constellation in the northern sky, which itself is named after the Greek mythological hero Perseus

The meteors are called Perseids because they appear to dart out of Perseus, a constellation within the northern sky, which itself is known as after the Greek mythological hero Perseus

Known as the 'fiery tears of Saint Lawrence', the celestial event takes place when the Earth ploughs through galactic debris left by the passing of the Swift-Tuttle Comet

Referred to as the ‘fiery tears of Saint Lawrence’, the celestial event takes place when the Earth ploughs through galactic debris left by the passing of the Swift-Tuttle Comet

Meteors, also known as shooting stars, come from leftover comet particles and bits from broken asteroids

Meteors, also referred to as shooting stars, come from leftover comet particles and bits from broken asteroids

TIPS FOR SPOTTING SHOOTING STARS 

‘The perfect thing you possibly can do to maximise the variety of meteors you will see is to get as far-off from urban light pollution as possible and discover a location with a transparent, unclouded view of the night sky,’ NASA says. 

Seek for the darkest patch of sky, as meteors can appear anywhere overhead.

The meteors will at all times travel in a path away from the constellation the shower is known as after – on this case, Gemini. The apparent point of origin is known as the ‘radiant’.

Looking for the constellation within the night sky, could help viewers spot more shooting stars.

NASA advises dressing up warmly and bringing something comfortable to lie or sit upon and advises people plan to remain outside taking a look at the skies for at the very least half an hour. It also says to place away telescopes and binoculars.

‘Using either reduces the quantity of sky you possibly can see at one time, lowering the chances that you will see anything but darkness. As an alternative, let your eyes hang loose and do not look in anybody specific spot.

‘Relaxed eyes will quickly zone in on any movement up above, and you will give you the option to identify more meteors.’

‘Nevertheless, skies will likely be cloudier within the far northwest of Scotland, and there will likely be some mist and fog patches in Northern Ireland and East Yorkshire,’ a Met Office spokesperson said.

‘Clear skies are also expected for many of the UK on Friday night for the Perseids meteor showers. 

‘Nevertheless again there will likely be a layer of cloud in northwest Scotland making for poor viewing conditions here.’

It’s possibly that light from the supermoon could make the Perseids harder to see. When anticipating meteors, the darker the sky the higher.

‘The brilliant moon may additionally make viewing the meteor shower a bit of tougher at times,’ the Met Office spokesperson said.

Meteors, also referred to as shooting stars, come from leftover comet particles and bits from broken asteroids.

When comets come across the Sun, the dust they emit steadily spreads right into a dusty trail around their orbits. 

Every 12 months, Earth passes through these debris trails, which allows the bits to collide with our atmosphere where they disintegrate to create fiery and vibrant streaks within the sky.    

Nevertheless, the events won’t pose a threat to humans because the objects nearly at all times burn up in our atmosphere before reaching the planet’s surface.  

The Swift-Tuttle Comet, which causes the Perseids, spans 16-miles wide and is formed of ice and rock.

It ploughs through our Solar System once every 133 years, with the last pass in 1992.

The comet will come inside a million miles of Earth on August 5, 2126 and August 24, 2261.

The name ‘Perseids meteor shower’ comes from the very fact meteors appear to shoot out from the Perseus constellation – the twenty fourth largest constellation within the sky. 

The event is best for viewing within the Northern Hemisphere throughout the pre-dawn hours, although sometimes it is feasible to view them as early as 10pm. 

‘The radiant for the Perseids – the purpose within the sky the meteors appear to come back from –  is in Perseus, and high within the Northern Hemisphere of the sky,’ said Dr Robert Massey, deputy executive director of the Royal Astronomical Society.   

‘It’s 58 degrees north of the celestial equator, which implies it might be overhead from 58 degrees north (the latitude of places like Ullapool in Scotland). 

‘This also means the radiant never rises for places south of 32 degrees south, so the southernmost parts of Australia, and far of Argentina and Chile.

‘The upshot is that the Northern Hemisphere has one of the best potential view, because the radiant is higher within the sky and visual for longer, so in theory more meteors are visible. 

‘As you progress further south the number declines, and south of 32 degrees south essentially none are seen.’  

The following major meteor shower will likely be the Draconids in October, even though it tends to tends to be a less energetic shower than the Perseids. 

The Draconid meteor shower comes from the debris of comet 21 P/ Giacobini-Zinner – a small comet with a diameter of 1.24 miles (2 kilometers). 

REMAINING METEOR SHOWERS IN 2022 

Perseids: August 12-13 – 100 per hour – Brilliant, fast meteors with trains

Draconids: October 8-9 – 10 per hour – From comet Giacobini-Zimmer

Orionids: October 21-22 – 25 per hour – Fast with tremendous trains

Taurids: October 10-11 (Southern), November 12-13 (Northern) – 5 per hour – Very slow

Leonids: November 17-18 – 10 per hour – Fast and brilliant

Geminids: December 14-15 – 150 per hour – Brilliant and plentiful, few trains

Ursids: December 22-23 – 10 per hour – Sparse shower 

Note: Dates discuss with each shower’s peak 

sportinbits@gmail.com
sportinbits@gmail.comhttps://sportinbits.com
Get the latest Sports Updates (Soccer, NBA, NFL, Hockey, Racing, etc.) and Breaking News From the United States, United Kingdom, and all around the world.

Related articles

spot_img

Recent articles

spot_img