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Two EXTREMELY rare megamouth sharks captured on video off the coast of San Diego by fishermen

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Two extremely rare megamouth sharks were captured on video off the coast of San Diego.

David Stabile was fishing along with his friends Val Costescu and Andrew Chang about 30 miles offshore after they saw the megamouth sharks. 

‘This weekend my friends and I went fishing off the coast of San Diego and video taped two of probably the most elusive sharks on this planet. Here’s some cool footage I took of the 2 Megamouth Sharks,’ Stabile wrote on Twitter. 

Within the videos, which were shared on Twitter and Facebook, the sharks will be seen slowly swimming very near the boat. One swims closer to the surface while the opposite will be seen a feet below it, moving almost in the opposite’s shadow.

Two extremely rare megamouth sharks were captured on video by a fisherman off the coast of San Diego this week 

David Stabile was fishing with his friends Val Costescu and Andrew Chang about 30 miles offshore when they saw the megamouth sharks

David Stabile was fishing along with his friends Val Costescu and Andrew Chang about 30 miles offshore after they saw the megamouth sharks

The second megamouth shark was captured off of Santa Catalina Island and is displayed at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. Above: Children peer into a stuffed specimen of a megamouth shark at Tokai University Marine Science Museum in Japan

The second megamouth shark was captured off of Santa Catalina Island and is displayed on the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. Above: Children peer right into a stuffed specimen of a megamouth shark at Tokai University Marine Science Museum in Japan

Megamouth, known formally as megachasma pelagios, is a species of deepwater shark that was discovered in 1976 and isn’t observed by humans. 

‘This may occasionally be a mating pair: the second video shows a male (clasper clearly visible) with a damaged left pectoral fin; the primary video is of a scarred shark that could be a female (no visible claspers),’ Alison Schulman-Janiger, a research associate at Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, explained in a Facebook post that shared the videos. ‘WOWZA!’

Megamouth sharks can grow as much as 18 feet long and are frequently found at depths of three,000 to fifteen,000 feet. 

The primary megamouth shark was captured on November 15, 1976, about 25 miles northeast of Kahuku, Hawaii, when it became entangled in the ocean anchor of a U.S. Navy ship. 

In response to Schulman-Janiger, the second megamouth shark was captured off of Santa Catalina Island and is displayed on the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. 

‘It is incredibly unusual to see them in the course of the day,’ she said.

'This may be a mating pair: the second video shows a male (clasper clearly visible) with a damaged left pectoral fin; the first video is of a scarred shark that may be a female (no visible claspers),' Alison Schulman-Janiger, a research associate at Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, explained in a Facebook post that shared the videos. 'WOWZA!'

‘This may occasionally be a mating pair: the second video shows a male (clasper clearly visible) with a damaged left pectoral fin; the primary video is of a scarred shark that could be a female (no visible claspers),’ Alison Schulman-Janiger, a research associate at Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, explained in a Facebook post that shared the videos. ‘WOWZA!’

Most sightings are likely to occur in a small area off of Taiwan. 

But not less than three – besides those from this week – have previously been seen off the coast of San Diego, two in 2018 and one in 2019. 

‘Some speculate that southern California could also be a breeding area for them,’ Schulman-Janiger said.

‘They spend the vast majority of their time in deep water removed from the shore,’ Dovi Kacev, a researcher with Scripps Institution of Oceanography, told CBS8. 

Megamouth sharks have also been seen in waters near the Philippines and South Africa.  

‘There’s still a number of unknowns about them so far as where they spend their time because we see them so unfrequently.’

‘The thing about fishing is you never know what you are gonna find. I believed I had seen all of it at this point but who would have thought I might see two megamouth sharks,’ Chang told CBS8. 

Megamouth sharks can grow up to 18 feet long and are usually found at depths of 3,000 to 15,000 feet. A 12-foot megamouth shark stares lifelessly from a South African beach where it washed up April 20, 2002

Megamouth sharks can grow as much as 18 feet long and are frequently found at depths of three,000 to fifteen,000 feet. A 12-foot megamouth shark stares lifelessly from a South African beach where it washed up April 20, 2002

'Some speculate that southern California may be a breeding area for them,' Schulman-Janiger said. Above: Fishermen use a stretcher with steels bars to carry a rare 15-foot megamouth shark, which was trapped in a fishermen's net in Burias Pass in Albay and Masbate provinces, central Philippines January 28, 2015

‘Some speculate that southern California could also be a breeding area for them,’ Schulman-Janiger said. Above: Fishermen use a stretcher with steels bars to hold a rare 15-foot megamouth shark, which was trapped in a fishermen’s net in Burias Pass in Albay and Masbate provinces, central Philippines January 28, 2015

The incident comes on the tail end of a summer that seems to have seen increased shark sightings. 

Late last month, an ideal white shark that weighs 1,400 kilos and is 13-feet long was tracked near Cape Cod.

The large shark, named Bob, is one among many fitted with a tool that enables researchers to know where they’re – that information is fed into platforms just like the Sharktivity app or the web site of Ocearch, a marine research group.

It had been almost 10 months since they received a location ping from Bob when the good white pinged on Sunday off Nantucket Island, Massachusetts.

‘We met Bob last September off Nova Scotia and he had last pinged off Jacksonville, Florida in November,’ the group said. 

‘We’re excited to listen to from Bob again and hope he continues to return to the surface and share his location with us!’

The massive sea creature was first tagged at Ironbound Island, Nova Scotia, in September 2021.

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